escape of Adolph Hitler in Argentina movie grey wolf

GREY WOLF : THE ESCAPE OF ADOLF HITLER (2014) 

This is a dramatization of supposed real events – the untold story of Adolf Hitler’s escape to Argentina at the end of WW2.

Based on interviews with eye witnesses in Argentina and years of detailed research, the film covers events from Hitler’s escape by air from the ruins of Berlin on April 28th, 1945, to Fuerteventura on the Canary Islands and then by U-boat to Argentina where he died tormented, demented and betrayed at a small house, ‘La Clara’ 45 miles from San Carlos De Bariloche in the Argentine Andes, at 3pm on February 13th, 1962.

Grey Wolf: The Escape of Adolf Hitler was originally a 2011 book by Gerrard Williams and Simon Dunstan. The book was adapted as a drama documentary film in 2014 directed and written by Gerrard Williams and produced by Magnus Peterson.

After Allied forces defeated Germany in World War II, Europe became a difficult place to be associated with Adolph Hitler’s Third Reich. Thousands of Nazi officers, high-ranking party members and collaborators—including many notorious war criminals—escaped across the Atlantic, finding refuge in South America, particularly in Argentina, Chile and Brazil.

Argentina, for one, was already home to hundreds of thousands of German immigrants and had maintained close ties to Germany during the war. After 1945, Argentine President Juan Perón, himself drawn to fascist ideologies, enlisted intelligence officers and diplomats to help establish “rat lines,” or escape routes via Spanish and Italian ports, for many in the Third Reich. Also giving aid: the Vatican in Rome, which in seeking to help Catholic war refugees also facilitated fleeing Nazis—sometimes knowingly, sometimes not.

As thousands of Nazis and their collaborators poured into the continent, a sympathetic and sophisticated network developed, easing the transition for those who came after. While no definitive evidence exists that Hitler himself escaped his doomsday bunker and crossed the ocean, such a network could have helped make it possible.

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