Tag Archives: grexit

Euro’s policies have destroyed Greece and led to new high levels of poverty in 2016


Provision of basic goods and services, such as food and heating,  it is deprived by the 39.9% of the population living in Greece with this percentage rocketing to 44.5%  for the 0-17 year old population. Moreover, almost one in five households ( 17.7%)  live in inadequate, unsafe houses with a leaking roof with moisture in walls and floors etc.

Overall, more than 4.512 million Greeks are at risk of poverty (Population in Greece is estimated at 11 millions) with children most at risk. This situation is reflected by the fact that 230 774 children live in households with no workers and virtually no income!

These elements are included in the final report of September 2016 issued by the Greek Statistical Authority (ELSTAT) concerning the Living conditions in Greece. 

Continue reading Euro’s policies have destroyed Greece and led to new high levels of poverty in 2016

Financial Warfare and the Destruction of Greece as a Nation


Syria is destroyed by military means. Greece is literally destroyed as a nation, as a society and as a state, by its own “partners”, in alliance with international Finance and its representative par excellence, the IMF and with the consent of the USA administration (1) Continue reading Financial Warfare and the Destruction of Greece as a Nation

How the Euro caused the Greek Crisis


Greece is in a state of economic and financial crisis that’s dominated global headlines this week. Vox’s Matt Yglesias explains the real roots of the crisis.

As an economic policy,the Eurozone, is an idea with some serious flaws. The Eurozone is not what economists call an optimal currency area — its economies are too big and disparate.

One way this flaw plays out is that Europe has very limited labor mobility compared to, say, the United States. If the economy is strong in the Netherlands but weak in Spain, it’s difficult for Spanish people to simply move to Amsterdam where they don’t speak Dutch. European countries maintain separate welfare states, and have very different average living standards. Consequently, economic conditions can be very different in one part of the Eurozone than in another, making it difficult for the ECB to create policy that is appropriate everywhere.

The political meaning of the Eurozone and the European Project differs a bit from place to place. To France and Germany, it means the end of war. To Ireland, it means independence from the United Kingdom. To Finland and Latvia and other eastern states, it means independence from the Russian sphere of influence. For Spain and Portugal, it means the end of dictatorship and integration into the realm of democracies. For Greece, it means (unlike Turkey) certification as a real European country.

Source: Vox. Related :

  • Greek government-debt crisis
  • Greek withdrawal from the eurozone
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  • The Euro Intercepts : WikiLeaks
  • Absolutely everything you need to know about Greece’s bailout crisis
  • How Europe failed Greece and what its European “partners” never learnt from recent European history


     

    Greece’s financial nightmare has lasted five years now. There’s no sign of real relief—for a very specific reason.

    While reading different Online Magazines regarding Greece one could come across a United States magazine called Salon (23/6/2015) which has a recent article entitled ” Europe wants Greece to suffer ” , and explains:

    What has been happening in Greece has been a long exercise in sadism by European elites, who care only about keeping their political project alive, regardless of how those who must deal with the consequences are affected. Three governments ago, Greece rang up a series of debts that they have no practical ability to pay back. The structure of the eurozone, 19 countries sharing a common currency, encouraged this debt buildup, which manifested through capital flows from the wealthier north to the southern periphery. With a single currency, investors chased higher returns in countries where capital was scarcer; this was part of the core euro design. When the investors pulled out and the debts came due, the northern states, led by Germany, pretended this didn’t happen and demanded their money back.

    Continue reading How Europe failed Greece and what its European “partners” never learnt from recent European history