Tag Archives: referendum

Opinion: So Who Annexed the Crimean Peninsula Then?


russia crimea

Due to the international media’s continued claims about the «annexation of Crimea», it’s been difficult for the citizens of the US and Europe to make sense of the details of the peninsula’s recent history. Exactly three years ago, on March 16, 2014, the Crimeans were offered a choice: to rejoin Russia or to return to the constitution of 1992 that proclaimed Crimea a legal, democratic, secular state whose relationship with Ukraine was based on bilateral agreements. That constitution was unilaterally abolished by Kiev on March 17, 1995, and here’s what’s surprising: no one at that time in the West demanded that the Ukrainian government stop violating the provisions of international law and the rights of the inhabitants of the Crimean peninsula. And then in 1995, special ops forces from the Security Service of Ukraine (SBU) and the Armed Forces of Ukraine (ZSU) landed in Crimea and Sevastopol in order to establish «Ukrainian law and order», seizing the building housing the Supreme Council of the republic, where the administration of the acting president of Crimea, Yuriy Meshkov, was also headquartered, and demanding that he be turned over. Since Meshkov refused to vacate his office, they tried to poison him. Much later he described how his drink had been poisoned, and that later in the hospital he was refused proper medical care. Only an emergency evacuation to Moscow miraculously saved his life. Continue reading Opinion: So Who Annexed the Crimean Peninsula Then?

Italy’s “perfect storm” as the gates of Europe are under siege from populism.


  • 00h30 Rome Time: Italian Prime Minister Matteo Renzi has resigned after suffering a heavy defeat in a referendum over his plan to reform the constitution.In a late-night statement, he said he took responsibility for the outcome. He said the No camp must now make clear proposals.

Video:

  • 11h:17 

Italian referendum: Exit polls show that voters have overwhelmingly rejected constitutional reform proposals on which Prime Minister Matteo Renzi has staked his political future:

Update: 19h*Austrian state broadcaster: exit polls suggest win for Van der Bellen ( Green Party-The Guardian):

  • The Guardian reports that early exit polls indicate Austria has voted in Green-backed candidate Alexander Van der Bellen as its next president, handing a painful defeat to rightwing populist Norbert Hofer.The defeat of far-right candidate Norbert Hofer to the liberal, left-of-centre Alexander Van der Bellen in Austria’s presidential electionsmarks a setback for the Eurosceptic, anti-establishment cause in Europe.
  • Analysis:

With Brexit and the U.S. presidential election, 2016 has already contributed its share of major political upsets. Yet another upset may be in the making. The  Italian referendum taking place today in Italy on constitutional reform and the second chance of Norbert Hofer of the anti-immigration Freedom Party (FPO) to become the first far-right president in Austria  could both possibly have disastrous consequences for Europe and the world.

Continue reading Italy’s “perfect storm” as the gates of Europe are under siege from populism.

Brexit EU referendum: British voters explain why they voted to leave, real or hoax?


‘I’ll never have to watch the Euros again’ Girlfriend over the moon at Brexit decision

A GIRL who got a little confused when discussing the EU “referendum” stated eggs, the Euros and Disneyland Paris had swayed her decision to vote Leave.

How the Euro caused the Greek Crisis


Greece is in a state of economic and financial crisis that’s dominated global headlines this week. Vox’s Matt Yglesias explains the real roots of the crisis.

As an economic policy,the Eurozone, is an idea with some serious flaws. The Eurozone is not what economists call an optimal currency area — its economies are too big and disparate.

One way this flaw plays out is that Europe has very limited labor mobility compared to, say, the United States. If the economy is strong in the Netherlands but weak in Spain, it’s difficult for Spanish people to simply move to Amsterdam where they don’t speak Dutch. European countries maintain separate welfare states, and have very different average living standards. Consequently, economic conditions can be very different in one part of the Eurozone than in another, making it difficult for the ECB to create policy that is appropriate everywhere.

The political meaning of the Eurozone and the European Project differs a bit from place to place. To France and Germany, it means the end of war. To Ireland, it means independence from the United Kingdom. To Finland and Latvia and other eastern states, it means independence from the Russian sphere of influence. For Spain and Portugal, it means the end of dictatorship and integration into the realm of democracies. For Greece, it means (unlike Turkey) certification as a real European country.

Source: Vox. Related :

  • Greek government-debt crisis
  • Greek withdrawal from the eurozone
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  • The Euro Intercepts : WikiLeaks
  • Absolutely everything you need to know about Greece’s bailout crisis